Good for Us

Why is Good Friday considered “good”?

Christ was betrayed by one disciple, denied by another, and deserted by the others. He was mocked and beaten, stripped and slapped, interrogated and jeered. He was declared innocent, but put to death anyway. The perfect became a sacrifice for the imperfect. He was forsaken by God, His Father. Body broken. Isolated and alone.

Why is this good? Continue reading

Merry Christmas, everyone!

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God grant you the light in Christmas, which is faith; the warmth of Christmas, which is love; the radiance of Christmas, which is purity; the righteousness of Christmas, which is justice; the belief in Christmas, which is truth; the all of Christmas, which is Christ.
– Wilda English

Love is Christ and Christ Is Love

Someone once pointed out that the word ‘love’ could be replaced with Christ every time it is mentioned in 1 Corinthians 13. That someone was correct:

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The Way of Christ

If I speak in the tongues of men and of angels, but have not Christ, I am a noisy gong or a clanging cymbal. And if I have prophetic powers, and understand all mysteries and all knowledge, and if I have all faith, so as to remove mountains, but have not Christ, I am nothing. If I give away all I have, and if I deliver up my body to be burned, but have not Christ, I gain nothing.

Christ is patient and kind; Christ does not envy or boast; He is not arrogant or rude. He does not insist on his own way; He is not irritable or resentful; He does not rejoice at wrongdoing, but rejoices with the truth. Christ bears all things, believes all things, hopes all things, endures all things.

Christ never ends. As for prophecies, they will pass away; as for tongues, they will cease; as for knowledge, it will pass away…

So now faith, hope, and Christ abide, these three; but the greatest of these is Christ.

Women of the Word: Joanna and Susanna

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Joanna and Susanna are two women who are introduced in the book of Luke and served alongside Christ during His earthly ministry. Luke 8:3 describes Joanna as “the wife of Chuza, the manager of Herod’s household.” Susanna is mentioned alongside her, and Scripture says, “these women were helping to support them [Jesus and His twelve disciples] out of their own means.”

Luke 24:10 goes on to say that Joanna was among the group of women who visited Jesus’ tomb after His resurrection. This Scripture specifically mentions Mary Magdalene, Joanna, and Mary the mother of James, but it is possible that Susanna was among the “others with them” who told the apostles that Jesus was risen. Continue reading

Women of the Word: Dorcas

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We read about Dorcas in Acts 9:36-43. Dorcas is a Greek name meaning “gazelle,” and Tabitha is the Aramaic version of the same name. Dorcas was a disciple of Jesus the Christ who lived in Joppa. She was known for her good works and for helping those in need. Acts 9:36 says that “she was always doing good and helping the poor.” When she became sick and died, those who knew her deeply missed her and mourned for her. Fortunately, Peter was able to raise her from the dead by the power of God and she was able to continue doing good works for many more years. Dorcas is a good example of how the life of every Christian believer should be – full of a living faith which manifests itself in good works for others and God. Continue reading

Women of the Word: David’s Ten Concubines

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In Old Testament Biblical times, it was common for men to have one or more wives and also several other women who they were not married to. These other women were called concubines and had lower status than the wives. King Solomon is probably the most infamous for this practice. He had 700 wives and 300 concubines. Three passages in the book of 2 Samuel (15:16; 16:22; 20:3), however, tell us that Solomon’s father, David, also had his share of concubines.

When he was running away from his rebellious son, Absalom, David left ten concubines behind to take care of the palace. Absalom took revenge on David and raped all ten women in a tent on the roof of the palace, in the sight of all Israel. Absalom later died in a tragic way and David was able to come back to the palace. When he returned, he took the ten concubines and put them in a house to themselves. David continued to provide for these women, but they were kept in confinement till the day of their death, living as widows. Continue reading