Cinderella

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Faith of Our Fairy Tales #19 (Original story / photo)

Story Scripture: But love your enemies, do good to them, and lend to them without expecting to get anything back. Then your reward will be great, and you will be children of the Most High, because he is kind to the ungrateful and wicked. – Luke 6:35

Story Saying: Always be a little kinder than necessary. – James M. Barrie

Behind the Story: Few would dispute that Cinderella is the queen of fairy tales. Hardly any other fairy tale has been so widely read, loved, or adapted. And perhaps that is because of the story’s overarching theme of kindness. Before she dies, Cinderella’s mother tells her, “Dear child, be good and pious, and then the good God will always protect you.” Cinderella does not fail in obeying her mother’s last words. She remains pious and good towards everyone and everything that comes into her life, including her mean stepmother and step-sisters. Continue reading

Women of the Word: Dorcas

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We read about Dorcas in Acts 9:36-43. Dorcas is a Greek name meaning “gazelle,” and Tabitha is the Aramaic version of the same name. Dorcas was a disciple of Jesus the Christ who lived in Joppa. She was known for her good works and for helping those in need. Acts 9:36 says that “she was always doing good and helping the poor.” When she became sick and died, those who knew her deeply missed her and mourned for her. Fortunately, Peter was able to raise her from the dead by the power of God and she was able to continue doing good works for many more years. Dorcas is a good example of how the life of every Christian believer should be – full of a living faith which manifests itself in good works for others and God. Continue reading

Women of the Word: Drusilla

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The Bible mentions Drusilla only once in Acts 24:24. History, however, has much more to say about her, and it is from there that we gather most of our information about this beautiful Jewish woman. Drusilla’s name means “watered by the dew.” The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia gives us the below background information on her from the historian Josephus:

Drusilla was the youngest of the three daughters of Agrippa I, her sisters being Bernice and Mariamne. She was born about 36 A.D. and was married when 14 years old to Azizus, king of Emeza. Shortly afterward she was induced to desert her husband by Felix, who employed a Cyprian sorcerer, Simon by name, to carry out his purpose. She was also influenced to take this step by the cruelty of Azizus and the hatred of Bernice who was jealous of her beauty. Her marriage with Felix took place about 54 A.D. and by him she had one son, Agrippa.

Drusilla’s second husband, Felix, was not Jewish, but he knew a lot about the Way. They both wanted to hear more from Paul about faith in Jesus the Christ. Acts 24:24 says:

Several days later Felix came with his wife Drusilla, who was Jewish. He sent for Paul and listened to him as he spoke about faith in Christ Jesus.

After listening to Paul, did Drusilla and Felix come to faith in Christ? The Bible bears no record that they did. It is both likely and unfortunate that they rejected the message of salvation and died in their sins. Continue reading

The Valiant Little Tailor

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Faith of Our Fairy Tales #18 (Original story / photo)

Story Scripture: But blessed is the one who trusts in the LORD, whose confidence is in him. – Jeremiah 17:7

Story Saying: If you’re presenting yourself with confidence, you can pull off pretty much anything. – Katy Perry

Behind the Story: Straight away, this fairy tale reminds me of the story of David in the Bible. With his bare hands and a small stone, David killed a lion, a bear, and the giant Goliath. With a shrewd mind and quick thinking, the little tailor outsmarted an entire gang of giants, caused two more giants to kill themselves, and caught a wild unicorn and a wild boar. After being asked to perform a number of seemingly impossible feats, both David and the little tailor married king’s daughters. By escaping through a window, David avoided being murdered by King Saul’s men. By pretending to be asleep, the little tailor avoided being murdered by the king’s servants. Continue reading

The White Snake

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Faith of Our Fairy Tales #17 (Original story / photo)

Story Scripture: Treat others the same way you want them to treat you. – Luke 6:31

Story Saying: Sooner or later in life, we will all take our own turn being in the position we once had someone else in. – Ashly Lorenzana

Behind the Story: This story begins by telling of how a king was famous throughout the entire land on account of his wisdom (à la King Solomon). This king, however, did not get his wisdom from God. Every day after dinner, a trusty servant brought him one covered dish. No one knew what was in the dish because the king always waited to eat of it until he was alone. One day, curiosity got the best of the trusty servant and he took the dish to his room and uncovered it. He found a white snake inside and decided to taste a little bit of it. As soon as he did so, he was given the power of understanding the language of animals. Continue reading

Hansel and Grethel (more commonly known as Gretel)

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Faith of Our Fairy Tales #16 (Original story / photo)

Story Scripture: The LORD himself goes before you and will be with you; he will never leave you nor forsake you. Do not be afraid; do not be discouraged. – Deuteronomy 31:8

Story Saying: When we face difficulties, we sometimes forget God’s past faithfulness. We see only the detours and the dangerous path. But look back and you will also see the joy of victory, the challenge of the climb, and the presence of your traveling Companion who has promised never to leave you nor forsake you. – Author Unknown

Behind the Story: Here is yet another popular fairy tale that nearly everyone has heard more than once. There are many different variations of this story, but I particularly love the original because it features a house made of sweets with windows of clear sugar. How delicious! What imagination! But it is not without a bit of darkness. I remember the first time my youngest brother and sister watched a cartoon version of Hansel and Grethel and they were so frightened of the ugly witch with her crooked nose zooming back and forth on a broom and cackling about her plans to stuff the poor children in an oven and roast them whole. The horror! But before we get to the witch, there are a few things we can learn from the other characters. Continue reading