Women of the Word: Job’s First Daughters

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In previous posts, we wrote about four other women who were apart of Job’s life: his wife and his second set of three daughters, Jemimah, Keziah, and Keren-Happuch. Now, we’re checking out his first set of three daughters who are namelessly mentioned in the Bible. Before a series of unfortunate events happened to Job, he had a relatively good life and a very large family. Job 1:2 says, “He had seven sons and three daughters.”

On their birthdays, Job’s sons liked to hold extravagant parties with a lot of food and drinks. They would invite their sisters to their parties and eat and drink for a long period of time. At one such party, which was held at the oldest’s brothers house, the brothers and sisters were eating and drinking and having a good old time when a mighty desert wind hit the house and caused it to collapse. Sadly, all of them died. What can we learn from the lives of three sisters who came to such a swift and unexpected end? Continue reading

Women of the Word: Paul’s Sister

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The apostle Paul was often put in prison because he refused to shut up about his faith in Jesus the Christ. On one such occasion, while he was in Jerusalem, the book of Acts records that nearly the whole city went into an uproar after some people saw him at the temple. This angry mob tried to beat Paul to death. Some Roman soldiers who were nearby delivered him from the mob by arresting him. Paul then barely saved himself from being flogged and interrogated before he was taken before the Sanhedrin and, finally, put in prison.

While Paul was in prison, some Jews plotted to kill him. They were so dedicated to carrying out this evil plot that they refused to eat or drink until he was dead. They probably would have been successful too if it weren’t for Paul’s nephew saving the day. Acts 23:16 says:

But when the son of Paul’s sister heard of this plot, he went into the barracks and told Paul.

When Paul was told about the plot, he called a Roman soldier and told him to take his nephew to the commander. This was done, and Paul’s nephew told the commander about the plot. He said, “Some Jews have agreed to ask you to bring Paul before the Sanhedrin tomorrow on the pretext of wanting more accurate information about him. Don’t give in to them, because more than forty of them are waiting in ambush for him. They have taken an oath not to eat or drink until they have killed him. They are ready now, waiting for your consent to their request.” The commander believed Paul’s nephew and told him not to tell anyone that he reported the plot to him.

In this way, Paul was saved. Instead of being killed, he was transferred safely to Caesarea. Perhaps Paul’s sister deserves some credit for this just as much as her son. Continue reading

Merry Christmas, everyone!

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God grant you the light in Christmas, which is faith; the warmth of Christmas, which is love; the radiance of Christmas, which is purity; the righteousness of Christmas, which is justice; the belief in Christmas, which is truth; the all of Christmas, which is Christ.
– Wilda English

Women of the Word: Lo-Ruhamah

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In a previous post, we discussed the life of Gomer. Gomer was a prostitute who became the wife of the faithful prophet Hosea. Hosea and Gomer had three children together: a boy named Jezreel, a girl named Lo-Ruhamah, and another boy called Lo-Ammi. The book of Hosea gives a fuller narration of what took place between Hosea and Gomer and how God used their story (in particular, Gomer’s unfaithfulness and the names of their children) to send messages regarding judgment and restoration to the people of Israel. The daughter, Lo-Ruhamah, is mentioned twice in Hosea’s book. Hosea 1:6 reads:

Gomer conceived again and gave birth to a daughter. Then the Lord said to Hosea, “Call her Lo-Ruhamah (which means “not loved”), for I will no longer show love to Israel, that I should at all forgive them.

And Hosea 1:8 reads:

After she had weaned Lo-Ruhamah, Gomer had another son.

Gomer probably lacked natural love for her daughter. After all, she abandoned her family and returned to her old ways of promiscuity and immorality, before Hosea went searching for her and brought her back. However, Lo-Ruhamah was loved by her father. And we can be certain that she was loved by God, just as all of us are loved by God. Continue reading

Love is Christ and Christ Is Love

Someone once pointed out that the word ‘love’ could be replaced with Christ every time it is mentioned in 1 Corinthians 13. That someone was correct:

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The Way of Christ

If I speak in the tongues of men and of angels, but have not Christ, I am a noisy gong or a clanging cymbal. And if I have prophetic powers, and understand all mysteries and all knowledge, and if I have all faith, so as to remove mountains, but have not Christ, I am nothing. If I give away all I have, and if I deliver up my body to be burned, but have not Christ, I gain nothing.

Christ is patient and kind; Christ does not envy or boast; He is not arrogant or rude. He does not insist on his own way; He is not irritable or resentful; He does not rejoice at wrongdoing, but rejoices with the truth. Christ bears all things, believes all things, hopes all things, endures all things.

Christ never ends. As for prophecies, they will pass away; as for tongues, they will cease; as for knowledge, it will pass away…

So now faith, hope, and Christ abide, these three; but the greatest of these is Christ.